Active Transportation Plan

The Bikeways & Trails Component of the Comprehensive Master Plan.

Picture1.pngThe Active Transportation Plan is the bikeways and trails component of the City of Virginia Beach Comprehensive Plan. This mobility plan was adopted by City Council on February 16, 2021, developed upon completion of:
  • Analysis of existing conditions in the City, including travel habits, crash rates, and social, economic, and environmental challenges
  • Review of local and regional existing planning documents
  • Extensive public outreach and input from the Bikeways & Trails Advisory Committee to collect feedback on where people already walk and bike today, where they would like to walk and bike, and barriers that may prevent them from doing so
  • Identification of areas where the walking and bicycling experience in Virginia Beach needs improvement
  • The development recommended pedestrian and bicycle routes with an emphasis on safety, accessibility, health, economic vitality, and the creation of a low-stress network for people of all ages and abilities


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"For Bicycles Only” pavement markings in this July 4, 1938 photo. Courtesy of Sargeant Memorial Collection, Norfolk Memorial Library
​From our very first Boardwalk Bike Path to today's master-planned and prioritized projects, the Active Transportation Network continues to grow. Those master-planned and prioritized routes that still await funding include exciting projects such as a pedestrian bridge over I-264 as an extension of the Thalia Creek Greenway and the Virginia Beach Trail that has appeared in the City's Bikeways & Trails Plans since 1981.

The Virginia Beach Trail #VBTrail is a proposed 10'-wide paved asphalt shared use path within the city-owned right-of-way (formerly the NSRR corridor). This approximately 66-foot wide corridor is 12 miles long and runs from the western city limit line all the way to our oceanfront. The eastern-most 1.5 miles of the trail is already constructed on the north side of Norfolk Avenue between Birdneck Road and Pacific Avenue. 

The remaining 10.5 miles of the VB Trail has been designed to 15% construction drawings. Currently, however, the project remains unfunded.